James Ivory, 89, May Set Oscar Record

James Ivory is 89, and should he win the Oscar for best adapted screenplay for “Call Me By Your Name,” he’ll become the oldest Oscar winner ever.

It’s a record Ivory may hold for only minutes. The 89-year-old French filmmaker Agnes Varda, born a week before Ivory, is nominated for her documentary “Faces Places.”

But regardless of the outcome, “Call Me By Your Name” has proven an unlikely, yet fitting, encore for a master filmmaker whose movies have already pocketed 31 Oscar nominations and six wins.

For some 50 years, Ivory and his partner and producer Ismail Merchant were considered one of the most illustrious independent filmmaking duo in film history.

Ivory says retirement isn’t in his plans. He’s hoping to direct a film of Shakespeare’s “Richard II.” (AP)

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2018 Oscar Nominations Announced

The nominations for the 90th annual Academy Awards were announced today:

The Oscar nominees for best motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: “Call Me By Your Name,” ”Darkest Hour,” ”Dunkirk,” ”Get Out,” ”Lady Bird,” ”Phantom Thread,” ”The Post,” ”The Shape of Water” ”Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

The Oscar nominees for best actor in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: Timothee Chalamet, “Call Me By Your Name”; Daniel Day Lewis, “Phantom Thread”; Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”; Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”; Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

The best supporting actor nominees include: William Dafoe, “The Florida Project”; Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”; Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”; Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”; Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

The Oscar nominees for best actress in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They are: Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”; Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”; Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”; Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”; Meryl Streep, “The Post.”

The Oscar nominees for best song in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: “Mighty River” from “Mudbound; “Mystery of Love” from “Call Me By Your Name”; “Remember Me” from “Coco”; “Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall; and “This is Me” from “The Greatest Showman.”

Oscar nominees for best foreign-language film have been announced by the film academy. They include: Chile’s “A Fantastic Woman”; Russia’s “Loveless”; Lebanon’s “The Insult”; Hungary’s “On Body and Soul”; and Sweden’s “The Square.”

The Oscar nominees for best supporting actress in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”; Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”; Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”; Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”; and Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water.”

The Oscar nominees for best original score in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: “Dunkirk,” Hans Zimmer; “Phantom Thread,” Jonny Greenwood; “The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat; “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” John Williams; “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Carter Burwell.

The Oscar nominees for best visual effects in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: “Blade Runner 2049,” ”Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” ”Kong: Skull Island,” ”Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” ”War for the Planet of the Apes.”

The Oscar nominees for best cinematography in a motion picture have been announced by the film academy. They include: They are: Roger Deakins, “Blade Runner 2024”; Bruno Delbonnel, “Darkest Hour”; Hoyte van Hoytema, “Dunkirk”; Rachel Morrison, “Mudbound”; Dan Laustsen, “The Shape of Water.”

The 90th annual Academy Awards are on March 4th. (AP)

Study Suggests Building Second Hollywood Sign to Ease Crowds

Locals and tourists alike appreciate the Hollywood sign, so why not build another?

That’s one of the suggestions from a study seeking ways to ease frustration about traffic near the world famous sign in Los Angeles.

The second sign on the other side of the hill would face toward the suburban San Fernando Valley.

The Los Angeles Times reported Wednesday that a few of the less fanciful ideas include a shuttle to ferry visitors to trails near the sign and an aerial tram to offer birds-eye views.

And the report by consulting firm Dixon Resources Unlimited suggests a Hollywood sign visitor center to teach tourists about its history.

The newspaper says many of the ideas are much more mundane – including adjusting parking restrictions and installing signs to guide pedestrians. (AP)

Text of Oprah Winfrey’s DeMille Award Acceptance Speech

In case you missed it, here’s the full text of Oprah Winfrey’s speech as she accepted the Cecil B. DeMille Award at Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards:

Hi. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you all. OK. OK. Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for Best Actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope, and said five words that literally made history: “The winner is Sidney Poitier.” Up to the stage came the most elegant man I had ever seen. I remember his tie was white and, of course, his skin was black. And I’d never seen a black man being celebrated like that. And I have tried many, many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door, bone tired from cleaning other people’s houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney’s performance in “Lilies of the Field,” ”Amen, amen. Amen, amen.”

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille Award right here at the Golden Globes, and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award.

It is an honor – it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who inspire me, who challenge me, who sustain me, and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson, who took a chance on me for “AM Chicago.” Quincy Jones, who saw me on that show and said to Steven Spielberg, “Yes, she is Sofia in ‘The Color Purple.'” Gayle, who has been the definition of what a friend is. And Stedman, who has been my rock. Just a few to name.

I’d like to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association because we all know that the press is under siege these days, but we also know that it is the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice -to tyrants and victims and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I’m especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell. And this year we became the story. But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue.

They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories, and they work in restaurants, and they’re in academia and engineering and medicine and science. They’re part of the world of tech and politics and business. They are athletes in the Olympics, and they are soldiers in the military. And there’s someone else: Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and a mother. She was just walking home from the church service she’d attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP, where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case. And together they sought justice. But justice wasn’t an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died 10 days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men, but their time is up.

Their time is up. Their time is up. And I just hope – I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks’ heart almost 11 years later when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery. And it’s here with every woman who chooses to say, “Me too” and every man, every man who chooses to listen. In my career what I’ve always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave, to say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, and how we overcome. I’ve interviewed and portrayed people who have withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here now to know that a new day is on the horizon.

And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say, “Me too” again. Thank you.

(AP)

Halle Berry, Carol Burnett Among Next Month’s Golden Globe Presenters

Halle Berry, Gal Gadot and Chris Hemsworth are among the first presenters announced for next month’s Golden Globe Awards.

Other presenters announced Thursday by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association include Carol Burnett, Shirley MacLaine, Hugh Grant, Kerry Washington, Emma Watson, Ricky Martin, Sarah Jessica Parker, Seth Rogan and Sharon Stone.

Oprah Winfrey also will be on hand, but she’s accepting a trophy. She was previously announced as the recipient of the association’s annual Cecil B. DeMille Award, which recognizes an outstanding contributor to entertainment.

The 75th Golden Globe ceremony will air Jan. 7 on NBC, with Seth Meyers as host.   (AP)

 

‘The Goonies,’ ‘Titanic’ Added to National Film Registry

A band of misfits known as the Goonies, a sinking ship, some baseball ghosts and the unrelenting New York cop are being added to the prestigious National Film Registry.

The Library of Congress announced Wednesday that the films “The Goonies,” ”Titanic,” ”Field of Dreams” and “Die Hard” are among the 25 movies tapped for preservation this year.

The library selects movies for preservation because of their cultural, historic or artistic importance.

This year’s slate includes the 1987 musical biopic “La Bamba,” ”Superman” from 1978, the 2000 thriller “Memento” and 1941’s animated “Dumbo.”

This year’s picks bring the total number of films in the registry to 725. Last year, “The Breakfast Club,” ”The Princess Bride” and “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” and “Thelma & Louise” were picked. (AP)

2018 Sundance Lineup Includes Robin Williams, Gloria Allred Documentaries

Documentaries about Robin Williams, Gloria Allred and Ruth Bader Ginsber and a Lizzie Borden film with Kristen Stewart are among the 110 features set to premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

The Sundance Institute announced the diverse lineup of films Wednesday for the annual festival in Park City, Utah.

Debra Granik’s long-awaited follow up to “Winter’s Bone” will also premiere during the festival, which runs from Jan. 18-28.

Festival programmers say the films this year highlight the stories of alternative voices and points of view, including films by and about women, and the experience of the African-American male in the world right now.

The Festival last year premiered films like “Get Out,” ”Call Me By Your Name” and “The Big Sick.”  (AP)