Private Service, Public Viewing for Cornell in Hollywood

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell is being laid to rest Friday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Representatives for the late singer-songwriter say private memorial service Friday will be followed by a public viewing of Cornell’s burial site.

The 52-year-old was pronounced dead May 18 after he was found unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room after a concert performance. Coroner’s officials released say preliminary autopsy results show the singer hanged himself, but full toxicology results remain pending. The singer’s family has disputed the findings and claim Cornell may have taken more of an anti-anxiety drug than he was prescribed.

Cornell was a leading voice of the grunge movement in the 1990s. Besides Soundgarden, he scored hits with Temple of the Dog and Audioslave. He is survived by his wife and two children. (AP)

CBS, NBC Also Refuse to Air Trump Advertisement

CBS and NBC have joined CNN in refusing to air an advertisement that lists President Donald Trump’s accomplishments while blaming the “fake news” media for not reporting on them.

Trump’s campaign team also says ABC would not air the ad, although an ABC representative did not immediately respond to queries on Friday. CNN said it did not air the ad because its request to eliminate a “fake news” graphic was refused. NBC similarly cited the “incorrect” graphic that was shown over the face of NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell, among others.

CBS isn’t commenting on why it turned down the ad.

The Trump campaign is using the networks’ refusal in fundraising pleas and says the decisions “set a chilling precedent against free speech rights.”

Tentative Writers Deal Will be For 3 Years

The Writers Guild of America says the tentative deal reached early Tuesday will cover its television and film writers for three years if ratified by its members.

The guild released a one-sentence statement confirming the deal and its length. There were no details on the terms of the agreement, or how it addressed compensation and health care issues that had been the major sticking points of this contract’s negotiations.

The deal’s announcement came more than 90 minutes after the previous contract expired. Pickets could have started Tuesday morning, immediately sending late night talk shows into reruns and eventually impacting scripted series and feature films in development.

The previous writers’ strike occurred nearly 10 years ago and gradually took a wider toll on Hollywood TV and movie production and the California economy.  (AP)

Faye Dunaway Speaks on Oscar’s Best Picture Fiasco

Actress Faye Dunaway says she thought co-presenter Warren Beatty was joking when he paused before showing her the envelope that should have contained the Oscar’s best picture winner.

Dunaway tells Lester Holt on NBC Nightly News she thought Beatty was stalling for effect.

Dunaway read “La La Land” as best picture winner rather than “Moonlight” after PwC partner Brian Cullinan mistakenly handed them the back-up envelope for Actress in a Leading Role instead of the envelope for Best Picture.

She says she read the movie’s title on the card but didn’t notice Emma Stone’s name.

Dunaway says she felt “completely stunned” and later felt guilty because she thought she could have done something to prevent the debacle.

Holt’s interview with Dunaway will air Tuesday on the “Today” show. (AP)

Tribeca Film Festival to Close With ‘Godfather’ Reunion, Screenings

The 16th Tribeca Film Festival will close with a “Godfather” cast reunion and a back-to-back screening of parts one and two of Francis Ford Coppola’s classic saga.

Tribeca announced Wednesday that the 45th anniversary screenings will be followed by a conversation with Coppola, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Robert Duvall, James Caan and Talia Shire. Robert De Niro, co-founder of the festival, naturally, will also join.

The New York festival also plans several other anniversary celebrations. A 25th anniversary of “Reservoir Dogs” will be followed by a chat with Quentin Tarantino and the cast. A sing-along will be held for the 25th anniversary of Disney’s “Aladdin.” And Michael Moore will be at the festival for the 15th anniversary of his “Bowling for Columbine.”

Tribeca will take place April 19-30. (AP)

Robert Osborne, Face of TCM, Dies at 84

Robert Osborne, the genial face of Turner Classic Movies and a walking encyclopedia of classic Hollywood, has died. He was 84.

Jennifer Dorian, general manager of TCM, announced Osborne’s death Monday. A publicist for the network said he passed away Monday in New York.

Osborne, who began his career as an actor, was a columnist for The Hollywood Reporter. He was the on-air host of Ted Turner’s fledgling classic movie network from its inception in 1994. He was there from the start, to introduce “Gone With the Wind,” and remained Turner Classic’s primary – and often sole – host since.

For TCM viewers, Osborne was a constant and calming presence. He introduced films with bits of history and trivia, and conducted interviews with stars about their favorite old films.  (AP)

Golden Globes Audience Grew by 1.5 Million Over Last year

The Nielsen company says Sunday’s Golden Globes show enjoyed a bump in its audience over last year’s.

The awards broadcast, aired on NBC with Jimmy Fallon hosting, was seen by 20 million viewers. That’s a boost of 1.5 million over the 18.5 million viewers who watched in January 2016. It represents an 8 percent surge year-to-year.

Last year’s show, hosted by Ricky Gervais, dropped 800,000 viewers from 2015, although that Globes telecast faced tough competition from the final 15 minutes of an NFL game on Fox.

The 2014 telecast, co-hosted by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, drew 20.9 million viewers to score as the most-watched Globes-fest in a decade. (AP)