Tentative Writers Deal Will be For 3 Years

The Writers Guild of America says the tentative deal reached early Tuesday will cover its television and film writers for three years if ratified by its members.

The guild released a one-sentence statement confirming the deal and its length. There were no details on the terms of the agreement, or how it addressed compensation and health care issues that had been the major sticking points of this contract’s negotiations.

The deal’s announcement came more than 90 minutes after the previous contract expired. Pickets could have started Tuesday morning, immediately sending late night talk shows into reruns and eventually impacting scripted series and feature films in development.

The previous writers’ strike occurred nearly 10 years ago and gradually took a wider toll on Hollywood TV and movie production and the California economy.  (AP)

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David Letterman Replaces Neil Young at Rock Hall Show

David Letterman will replace an ailing Neil Young as the person inducting Pearl Jam into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame on Friday.

According to a statement from the hall, Young “is regrettably no longer able to induct Pearl Jam” due to illness and is “thrilled” that former TV talk-show host Letterman will substitute. Pearl Jam made its “Late Show with David Letterman” debut in 1996 with a version of “Hail, Hail.”

In addition to Pearl Jam, the new rock class incudes the late rapper Tupac Shakur, ELO, Journey, Nile Rodgers, Joan Baez and Yes. The ceremony will be held at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

The Hall of Fame is located in Cleveland. (AP)

Peabody Awards Ceremony to Air June 2 on PBS and Fusion

The Peabody Awards says it has partnered with PBS and the Fusion network for a special TV broadcast of the 76th Annual Peabody Awards Ceremony.

The red-carpet event will take place May 20 in New York. A joint broadcast of that program is scheduled to air June 2. The collaboration marks the first time the awards ceremony will be telecast on both national broadcast and cable television. Rashida Jones, who appeared in the Peabody-winning “Parks and Recreation,” will serve as the evening’s host.

The 30 winners, representing the best in electronic media, will be revealed in a series of announcements beginning April 12.

Founded in 1940, the Peabody Awards are based at the University of Georgia. (AP)

Tribeca Film Festival to Close With ‘Godfather’ Reunion, Screenings

The 16th Tribeca Film Festival will close with a “Godfather” cast reunion and a back-to-back screening of parts one and two of Francis Ford Coppola’s classic saga.

Tribeca announced Wednesday that the 45th anniversary screenings will be followed by a conversation with Coppola, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Robert Duvall, James Caan and Talia Shire. Robert De Niro, co-founder of the festival, naturally, will also join.

The New York festival also plans several other anniversary celebrations. A 25th anniversary of “Reservoir Dogs” will be followed by a chat with Quentin Tarantino and the cast. A sing-along will be held for the 25th anniversary of Disney’s “Aladdin.” And Michael Moore will be at the festival for the 15th anniversary of his “Bowling for Columbine.”

Tribeca will take place April 19-30. (AP)

Robert Osborne, Face of TCM, Dies at 84

Robert Osborne, the genial face of Turner Classic Movies and a walking encyclopedia of classic Hollywood, has died. He was 84.

Jennifer Dorian, general manager of TCM, announced Osborne’s death Monday. A publicist for the network said he passed away Monday in New York.

Osborne, who began his career as an actor, was a columnist for The Hollywood Reporter. He was the on-air host of Ted Turner’s fledgling classic movie network from its inception in 1994. He was there from the start, to introduce “Gone With the Wind,” and remained Turner Classic’s primary – and often sole – host since.

For TCM viewers, Osborne was a constant and calming presence. He introduced films with bits of history and trivia, and conducted interviews with stars about their favorite old films.  (AP)

Oscars Get 32.9 Million Viewers, Lowest Rating Since 2008

The 32.9 million viewers tuning into Sunday’s Academy Awards represented a drop-off of more than a million from last year and Oscar’s smallest audience since 2008.

The Nielsen company said Monday that viewership dipped notably from the 34.3 million who watched the ABC telecast in 2016.

In both 2014 and 2013, the awards show reached more than 40 million viewers, while 37.3 million were watching in 2015.

In 2008, just 32 million viewers tuned in.

The ceremony, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, maintained a political edge as many winners, presenters and Kimmel himself took digs at President Donald Trump.

But the most memorable twist was saved for the broadcast’s final moments when presenter Faye Dunaway mistakenly declared “La La Land” as Oscar-winning best picture before the record was corrected to “Moonlight.”  (AP)

Tupac Shakur, Pearl Jam, Yes to be Inducted Into Rock Hall

The late rapper Tupac Shakur and Seattle-based rockers Pearl Jam lead a class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees that also include folkie Joan Baez and 1970s favorites Journey, Yes and Electric Light Orchestra.

The rock hall also said Tuesday it would give a special award to Nile Rodgers, whose disco-era band Chic failed again to make the cut after its 11th time nominated.

The hall’s 32nd annual induction ceremony takes place on April 7 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. HBO will show highlights at a later date, with SiriusXM doing a radio broadcast.

Shakur, Baez, Pearl Jam and ELO were all elected in their first year as nominees. (AP)