David Letterman Replaces Neil Young at Rock Hall Show

David Letterman will replace an ailing Neil Young as the person inducting Pearl Jam into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame on Friday.

According to a statement from the hall, Young “is regrettably no longer able to induct Pearl Jam” due to illness and is “thrilled” that former TV talk-show host Letterman will substitute. Pearl Jam made its “Late Show with David Letterman” debut in 1996 with a version of “Hail, Hail.”

In addition to Pearl Jam, the new rock class incudes the late rapper Tupac Shakur, ELO, Journey, Nile Rodgers, Joan Baez and Yes. The ceremony will be held at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

The Hall of Fame is located in Cleveland. (AP)

Tupac Shakur, Pearl Jam, Yes to be Inducted Into Rock Hall

The late rapper Tupac Shakur and Seattle-based rockers Pearl Jam lead a class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees that also include folkie Joan Baez and 1970s favorites Journey, Yes and Electric Light Orchestra.

The rock hall also said Tuesday it would give a special award to Nile Rodgers, whose disco-era band Chic failed again to make the cut after its 11th time nominated.

The hall’s 32nd annual induction ceremony takes place on April 7 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. HBO will show highlights at a later date, with SiriusXM doing a radio broadcast.

Shakur, Baez, Pearl Jam and ELO were all elected in their first year as nominees. (AP)

N.W.A. Joins Quartet of 1970s Hit-Makers in Rock Hall

The groundbreaking Los Angeles rap act N.W.A. will join a quartet of 1970s era FM radio rockers – Chicago, Cheap Trick, Deep Purple and Steve Miller – as 2016 inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

N.W.A., led by Dr. Dre and Ice Cube, was elected after three unsuccessful nominations in a year when a movie about the group’s career, “Straight Outta Compton,” was a box-office hit. Their hard-core tales of life on the street on songs like “F— the Police” made them a provocative chart presence in the late 1980s and influenced an empire of other acts.

Both Miller and Cheap Trick made it during their first year on the ballot.

The induction ceremony for the Cleveland-based hall will be held April 8 in Brooklyn’s Barclays Center. HBO will televise highlights later in the spring.

Guitarist Miller came out of the San Francisco rock scene and became a dependable maker of pop hits like “Take the Money and Run,” ”Fly Like an Eagle,” ”Jet Airliner” and “Jungle Love.”

Midwestern favorites Cheap Trick succeeded with a highly amped version of Beatles-influenced melodies on hits “Surrender” and “Dream Police.” Their “Live at Budokan” album is one of rock’s best-known live sets. Guitarist Rick Nielsen and rumpled drummer Bun E. Carlos gave them an indelible live presence.

Cheap Trick moved swiftly to capitalize on the honor, announcing Thursday they had signed a new deal with Taylor Swift’s label, Big Machine Records. The band will release its 17th studio album a week before its induction.

“Thanks to all the fans who have supported us for all these years and to the Hall of Fame members who cast their votes,” said bass player Tom Petersson. “We are excited and honored.”

The guitar riff for Deep Purple’s “Smoke on the Water” remains one of the most recognizable in rock history. Guitarist Ritchie Blackmore was a stalwart in a hard rock act that competed with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath for the loyalty of metalheads.

Before shortening its name from the Chicago Transit Authority, Chicago was known for its jazz-rock fusion. The band had a string of pop hits including “Saturday in the Park,” ”25 or 6 to 4,” ”If You Leave Me Now” and “Does Anyone Really Know What Time it Is?”

More than 800 voters of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation selected the inductees.

The influential disco-era band Chic is becoming the Susan Lucci of music, failing to win induction in its 10th year as a nominee. Janet Jackson, The Cars, Los Lobos and Yes were among the other nominees rejected. (AP)

Nirvana, Kiss, Peter Gabriel Headed to Rock Hall

Nirvana, Kiss and Peter Gabriel will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next year.

The Rock Hall announced Tuesday that Hall and Oates, Linda Ronstadt and Cat Stevens will also be inducted April 10 at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

Among the first-time nominees are Hall and Oates, Gabriel, Ronstadt and Nirvana, nominated in its first year of eligibility. Repeat nominees Kiss and Stevens make the cut after being absent from the list for several years.

The Rolling Stones managers, Andrew Loog Oldham and Brian Epstein, will earn the Ahmet Ertegun award, a non-performing honor.

Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band will earn the award for musical excellence.

The 29th annual induction ceremony will be open to the public. Tickets go on sale next month.

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Online: http://www.rockhall.com (AP)

Rolling Stones Rock Brooklyn at Anniversary Gig

stones2

The Rolling Stones — average age 68-plus, if you’re counting — were in rollicking form as they rocked the Barclays Center in Brooklyn for 2 1/2 hours Saturday night, their first U.S. show on a mini-tour marking a mind-boggling 50 years as a rock band.

And although every time the Stones tour, the inevitable questions arise, — whether it’s “The Last Time,” to quote one of their songs — there was no sign that anything is ending anytime soon.

“People say, why do you keep doing this?” mused 69-year-old Mick Jagger, the band’s impossibly energetic frontman, before launching into “Brown Sugar.” “Why do you keep touring, coming back? The answer is, you’re the reason we’re doing this. Thank you for buying our records and coming to our shows for the last 50 years.”

Jagger was in fine form, with strong vocals and his usual swagger — strutting, jogging, skipping and pumping his arms like a man half his age. And though he briefly donned a flamboyant feathered black cape for “Sympathy for the Devil” and later, some red-sequined tails, he was mostly content to prowl the stage in a tight black T-shirt and trousers.

The band’s guitarists, the brilliant Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, alternated searing solos and occasionally ventured onto a stage extension that brought them closer to the crowd. The now-gray Richards, wearing a red bandana, exuded the easy familiarity of a favorite uncle: “While we wait for Ronnie,” he said at one point, “I’ll wish you happy holidays.” Watts, the dapper drummer in a simple black T-shirt, smiled frequently at his band mates.

The grizzled quartet was joined on “Gimme Shelter” by Mary J. Blige, who traded vocals with Jagger and earned a huge cheer at the end. Also visiting: the Texas blues guitarist Gary Clark Jr.

The sense of nostalgia was heightened by projections on a huge screen of footage of the early days, when the Stones looked like teenagers. At one point, Jagger reminisced about the first time the band played New York — in 1964.

A carton of milk cost only a quarter then, he said. And a ticket to the Rolling Stones? “I don’t want to go there,” he quipped. It was a reference to the sky-high prices at the current “50 and Counting” shows, where even the “cheap” seats cost a few hundred dollars and a prime seat cost in the $700 range or higher.

From the opening number, “Get Off Of My Cloud,” the band played a generous 23 songs, including two new ones — “Doom and Gloom” and “One More Shot” — but mostly old favorites.  The rousing encore included “Jumping Jack Flash,” of course, but the final song was “Satisfaction.” And though the song speaks of not getting any, the consensus of the packed 18,000-seat arena was that it was a satisfying evening indeed.

“If you like the Stones, this was as good a show as you could have had,” said one fan, Robert Nehring, 58, of Westfield, N.J., who’d paid $500 for his seat. “It was worth it,” he said simply.

The Brooklyn show was a coup for the new Barclays Center — there are no Manhattan shows. It followed two rapturously received Stones shows in London late last month. The band also will play two shows in Newark, N.J., on Dec. 13 and 15.

And just before that, the Stones will join a veritable who’s who of British rock royalty and U.S. superstars at the blockbuster 12-12-12 Superstorm Sandy benefit concert at Madison Square Garden. Also scheduled to perform: Paul McCartney, the Who, Eric Clapton, Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, Alicia Keys, Kanye West, Eddie Vedder, Billy Joel, Roger Waters and Chris Martin.

In a flurry of anniversary activity, the band also released a hits compilation last month with two new songs, “Doom and Gloom” and “One More Shot,” and HBO premiered a new documentary on their formative years, “Crossfire Hurricane.”

The Stones formed in London in 1962 to play Chicago blues, led at the time by the late Brian Jones and pianist Ian Stewart, along with Jagger and Richards, who’d met on a train platform a year earlier. Bassist Bill Wyman and Watts were quick additions.

Wyman, who left the band in 1992, was a guest at the London shows last month, as was Mick Taylor, the celebrated former Stones guitarist who left in 1974 and replaced by Wood, the newest Stone and the youngster at 65.

The inevitable questions have been swirling about the next step for the Stones: another huge global tour, on the scale of their last one, “A Bigger Bang,” which earned more than $550 million between 2005 and 2007? Something a bit smaller? Or is this mini-tour, in the words of their new song, really “One Last Shot?”

The Stones won’t say. But in an interview last month, they made clear they felt the 50th anniversary was something to be marked.

“I thought it would be kind of churlish not to do something,” Jagger told The Associated Press. “Otherwise, the BBC would have done a rather dull film about the Rolling Stones.”

There certainly was nothing dull about the band’s performance on Saturday, a show that brought together many middle-aged fans, to be sure, but also some of their children, who seemed to be enjoying the classic Stones brand of blues-tinged rock as much as their parents.

Yes, a Stone’s average age might be a bit higher than that of the average Supreme Court justice.  (To be fair, the newest justices bring the average down). But to watch these musicians play with vitality and vigor a half-century on is to believe that maybe they were right when they sang, “Time Is On My Side.” At least for a few more years.  (AP)

Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys Dies at 47

(Very saddened to learn about Adam Yauch’s death. Run-DMC and the Beastie Boys were my first concert – when I was 11 (’87). I could not go unless my friend and I both won tickets – so we did from a Reno radio station. Did not make my father or her father happy – at all, but we still got to go – with them. In case you’re curious, my second concert was Tiffany (’88) and my third, INXS in Sacramento (’88.)

Adam Yauch, a founding member of the hip-hop group Beastie Boys, died Friday in New York after a nearly three-year battle with cancer. He was 47.
Known by his stage name MCA, Yauch was inducted just last month into the Rock and Hall of Fame but was too ill to join bandmates Mike ‘Mike D’ Diamond and Adam ‘Ad-Rock’ Horovitz at the ceremony.

Among a flood of music stars sending their tributes was Justin Timberlake, who Tweeted: “Crushed to hear the news of Adam Yauch’s passing. A true pioneer of art.”

Reverend Run from Run-D.M.C. added, “I’m devastated. Praying for Adam Yauch’s family from the legendary Beastie Boys. You’ll be missed!”

The Brooklyn-born Yauch taught himself to play the bass guitar and, while in high school, formed the Beastie Boys.

Starting out as a punk group, the band transitioned to hip-hop and their first album Licensed to Ill, with the youth anthem “(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (To Party),” became a blockbuster seller.

The Beastie Boys went on to sell more than 40 million albums and have gone down as trailblazers in rap music. Licensed to Ill became the first hip-hop album to top the Billboard 200.

“Adam was incredibly sweet and the most sensitive artist who I loved dearly,” says producer Russell Simmons, a mentor and the band’s early manager. “I was always inspired by his work. He will be missed by all of us.”

Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys Dies at 47| Beastie Boys, Death, Tributes, Music News, Adam Yauch

Adam Yauch and his daughter (Polaris)

A Director and Philanthropist

Yauch also directed many of the Beastie Boys music videos, including the band’s 2006 concert film Awesome; I F—– Shot That!.
He was also a founding member of both the Milarepa Foundation that produced the Tibetan Freedom Concert benefits and the film production and distribution company Oscilloscope Laboratories.

In 2009, he announced that a cancerous tumorwas discovered in his left salivary gland. At the time, the band postponed the release of their new album.

Although his cancer was caught early and described as “very treatable,” Yauch revealed in January 2011 that he had still not fully recovered.
“While I’m grateful for all the positive energy people are sending my way, reports of my being totally cancer free are exaggerated,” Yauch said in a statement at the time, according to Rolling Stone. “I’m continuing treatment, staying optimistic and hoping to be cancer free in the near future.”
Yauch is survived by his wife, Dechen Wangdu, and 14-year-old daughter, Tenzin Losel Yauch.

(people.com, flickr)

Polanski’s `Carnage’ to Open New York Film Fest

From left, Jodie Foster, John C. Reilly, Christoph Waltz and Kate Winslet in  Sony

Roman Polanski’s “Carnage” will open this year’s New York Film Festival.

The film is adapted from Yasmina Reza’s 2009 Tony Award-winning play, “God of Carnage.” Shot inParisearlier this year, it stars Jodie Foster, Kate Winslet, Christoph Waltz and John C. Reilly.

The play is about a degenerating evening between two couples meeting after their kids were involved in a playground fight. Like the Broadway production, the film is set inBrooklyn. The original play was in French and set inParis.

Richard Pena, selection committee chairman and program director, calls the film “a new pinnacle” for the director.

“Carnage” will first premiere at the Venice Film Festival in September. Sony Pictures Classic will release “Carnage” later this year.

The 49th annual festival runs Sept. 30 through Oct. 16.

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Online: http://www.filmlinc.com

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)