Halloween Costume-O-Matic

I saw this today on the New York Times website and just had to share. I love stuff like this and wish I could come up with ideas like this! AH!

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‘The Book of Mormon’ Leads Tony Award Nominations

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AP Photo/Boneau/Bryan-Brown, Joan Marcus

In this file theater publicity image released by Boneau/Bryan-Brown, from left, Rema Webb, Andrew Rannells and Josh Gad perform in “The Book of Mormon” at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre in New York. “The Book of Mormon” has been a critical and box-office darling even without big-name stars and Tuesday’s Tony Award nominations could give it an extra boost.

NEW YORK — “The Book of Mormon” nabbed a leading 14 Tony Award nominations Tuesday morning, earning the profane musical nods for best musical, best book of a musical, best original score, two leading actor spots and two featured actor nominations, among others.

The second-highest nominations went to “The Scottsboro Boys,” a searing tale of 1930s injustice framed as a minstrel show. It received 12 nominations, including best musical, best book of a musical, best original score as well as a leading actor and two featured actor nods.

Among others who earned nominations were Al Pacino, who played Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice,” Vanessa Redgrave in “Driving Miss Daisy,” Edie Falco in “The House of Blue Leaves” and Ellen Barkin in “The Normal Heart.”

Some notable snubs included James Earl Jones in “Driving Miss Daisy,” Daniel Radcliffe in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” and Aaron Tveit from “Catch Me If You Can.”

The Cole Porter comedy “Anything Goes” was nominated for nine awards, including best revival, best leading actress for Sutton Foster, a best featured role nomination for Adam Godley, best scenic and costume design.

“I’m very happy. I’m thrilled for our show,” said Kathleen Marshall, who picked up her sixth and seventh nominations for directing “Anything Goes” and its high-kicking choreography. “‘Anything Goes’ is one of those shows that is there to delight and entertain and transport the audience.”

“The Book of Mormon,” about two Mormon missionaries who find more than they bargained for in Africa, was written by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of Comedy Central’s irreverent “South Park,” and Robert Lopez, co-creator of the equally irreverent Tony Award-winning musical “Avenue Q.”

The trio teamed up with Casey Nicholaw, who co-directed with Parker and choreographed. Both won nominations for best direction and Nicholaw won a best choreography nomination. “Mormon” also earned its two missionaries — Josh Gad and Andrew Rannells — acting nominations as well as Nikki M. James for featured actress.

Of the 42 new productions this season, there were 14 musicals — 12 new ones and two revivals — and 25 plays, a whopping 16 of them brand new. The last time there were 16 new plays produced in a single season was 1986-87.

It is also shaping up to be a lucrative time for Broadway, with total box-office grosses already at more than $987,057,484, or 3.6 percent more than the same time last year. Attendance this season is at over 11.4 million, up 3 percent from this time last year.

The awards will be handed out June 12 at a new location: the Beacon Theatre on the Upper West Side of Manhattan after producers lost their long-term space at Radio City Music Hall. It will be broadcast live by CBS.

http://www.tonyawards.com

‘Black Swan,’ ‘King’s Speech’ Win Costume Awards

“Black Swan,” “The King’s Speech” and “Alice in Wonderland” are tops in costumes.

The three films claimed prizes Tuesday at the 13th annual Costume Designers Guild Awards. “Swan” was honored for excellence in contemporary film, “Speech” won the period film prize and

“Alice” was recognized as the best fantasy film.

Jenny Beavan, who designed “The King’s Speech” costumes, and Colleen Atwood, who created the “Alice in Wonderland” costumes, are also nominated for Academy Awards.

The costumes for “Glee,” “Boardwalk Empire” and TV movie “Temple Grandin” were also honored.

The Costume Designers Guild was founded in 1953 and comprises 700 film, TV and commercial costume designers.

 (Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

‘Slumdog,’ ‘Duchess’ Top Costume Nods

‘Dark Knight’ also honored at CDG ceremony

By Gregg Kilday

Feb 18, 2009, 01:00 AM ET

“Slumdog Millionaire” added one more trophy to its hardware collection as costume designer Suttirat Larlarb picked up the excellence in contemporary film award Tuesday night at the 11th annual Costume Designers Guild Awards.

The period film award went to Michael O’Connor for the 18th-century designs in “The Duchess,” while the fantasy film award went to Lindy Hemming for the comics-derived duds of “The Dark Knight.”

At the Beverly Wilshire awards dinner hosted by Debra Messing, Donna Zakowska earned the TV movie/miniseries award for HBO’s “John Adams.”

ABC’s “Ugly Betty,” which won in the contemporary TV series category for the past two years, picked up award No. 3, with the honors going to Edwardo Castro and Patricia Field.

AMC’s “Mad Men” earned its first CDG award as Katherine Jane Bryant was honored in the period/fantasy TV series category.

A milk commercial called “White Gold” brought home the commercial costume design award for designer Casey Storm.

Sharon Stone presented the Swarovski President’s Award to actor-producer Michael Douglas. Prolific TV director James Burrows received the Distinguished Collaborator Award.

Costume designer Marilyn Vance (“The Untouchables,” “Pretty Woman”) was the recipient of the Lacoste Career Achievement in Film Award. Van Broughton Ramsey received the Career Achievement in Television nod.

‘Slumdog,’ ‘Duchess’ top costume nods

‘Dark Knight’ also honored at CDG ceremony

By Gregg Kilday

Feb 18, 2009, 01:00 AM ET

“Slumdog Millionaire” added one more trophy to its hardware collection as costume designer Suttirat Larlarb picked up the excellence in contemporary film award Tuesday night at the 11th annual Costume Designers Guild Awards.

The period film award went to Michael O’Connor for the 18th-century designs in “The Duchess,” while the fantasy film award went to Lindy Hemming for the comics-derived duds of “The Dark Knight.”

At the Beverly Wilshire awards dinner hosted by Debra Messing, Donna Zakowska earned the TV movie/miniseries award for HBO’s “John Adams.”

ABC’s “Ugly Betty,” which won in the contemporary TV series category for the past two years, picked up award No. 3, with the honors going to Edwardo Castro and Patricia Field.

AMC’s “Mad Men” earned its first CDG award as Katherine Jane Bryant was honored in the period/fantasy TV series category.

A milk commercial called “White Gold” brought home the commercial costume design award for designer Casey Storm.

Sharon Stone presented the Swarovski President’s Award to actor-producer Michael Douglas. Prolific TV director James Burrows received the Distinguished Collaborator Award.

Costume designer Marilyn Vance (“The Untouchables,” “Pretty Woman”) was the recipient of the Lacoste Career Achievement in Film Award. Van Broughton Ramsey received the Career Achievement in Television nod.

Everything I Wanted to Say….

From the LA Times:

And the award didn’t go to Hollywood

Europeans, and two iconoclasts from Minnesota, stand out. Even the best song beat a blockbuster.
By John Horn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
February 25, 2008
Hollywood took on a new role in Sunday’s 80th annual Academy Awards: bit player.In a series of startling upsets and a few expected triumphs, almost all of the top Oscars were handed to foreigners and iconoclastic show business outsiders. Every one of the evening’s winning actors came from beyond American borders, and the ceremony’s dominant film — best picture winner “No Country for Old Men” — was created by a pair of filmmaking brothers from Minnesota who have never made a mainstream movie in their three-decade career.

In an era when overseas revenue accounts for more than half of a movie’s income, the percentages were tilted far more heavily toward foreigners throughout the awards show, with an especially strong showing from Europe.

Best actor Daniel Day-Lewis of “There Will Be Blood” lives in Ireland, while “La Vie en Rose” surprise best actress winner Marion Cotillard makes her home in Paris. Spain’s Javier Bardem was named best supporting actor for “No Country for Old Men,” and Scotland’s Tilda Swinton won best supporting actress for “Michael Clayton.” Many of the evening’s lower-profile awards — for art direction, makeup, costume design and animated short among them — went to non-American filmmakers and designers.

“Hollywood is built on Europeans! Go back and look,” Swinton said backstage after her triumph. “I’m really sad I couldn’t give a speech in Gaelic.”

After he won his supporting actor Oscar, Canary Islands-born Bardem gave a shout-out to his actress mother — in Spanish, adding, also in Spanish, “This is for Spain, this is for all of you.”

It wasn’t just foreign accents, and foreign-language acceptance speeches, that set many of the evening’s winners apart: The big winners all have distinctive creative voices too. Though quite a few of the victors were hardly household names, almost all of the Oscar recipients are known by film lovers for their fierce determination to invent singular work not typically embraced by the studios. Day-Lewis, who won a best actor Oscar for “My Left Foot” in 1989, is very selective about his acting jobs, having appeared in only three movies over the last 10 years. In fact, he once took a hiatus from acting to study shoemaking.

Joel and Ethan Coen won not only the best picture honor for co-producing “No Country for Old Men” with Scott Rudin, but also took home Oscars for directing the film and adapting Cormac McCarthy’s gothic crime novel. In accepting their shared directing prize, Joel Coen said he and his brother were not making movies all that differently from when they were kids in the 1960s shooting with a Super 8 camera. “We’re very thankful to all of you out there for letting us continue to play in our corner of the sandbox,” Joel Coen said.

In what perhaps captured the tenor of the night most fittingly, “Falling Slowly” was honored as best original song. The tiny love ballad comes from the equally small Irish film “Once,” and defeated three flashy songs from Disney musical blockbuster “Enchanted.”

“This is such a big deal, not only for us, but for all other independent musicians and artists that spend most of their time struggling,” said the song’s co-writer and the film’s co-star, the Czech Republic’s Marketa Irglova, after returning to the stage of the Kodak Theatre because she was inadvertently played off by the orchestra before she had a chance to speak. “This song was written from a perspective of hope, and hope at the end of the day connects us all, no matter how different we are.”

Given that Hollywood was recently torn — and the Oscar broadcast nearly eviscerated — by a nasty labor strike, it was appropriate that acclamation would be showered on so many people working beyond the town’s customary orbits. The best original screenplay statue was presented to “Juno’s” Diablo Cody, a former stripper and peep-show worker who made her fiction writing debut on the movie about a precocious pregnant teen.

“It’s a great year for extraordinary films,” the film’s director, Jason Reitman, said after the show. “It’s a great year for unique films. Nothing felt popular or included because it was popular.”

The Paris-born Cotillard, who played singer Edith Piaf in “La Vie En Rose,” won the best actress honor against the favorite, swinging London survivor Julie Christie. “It is true, there is some angels in this city,” Cotillard said in fractured English in collecting her award.

The show began with an Anglo-French rout: Costume design went to the British team behind “Elizabeth: The Golden Age.” Makeup went French as well, to the couple responsible for aging Cotillard from youth to her middle-age death in “La Vie En Rose.” Visual effects was the mostly British team behind “The Golden Compass.”

Art direction was a double whammy, going to two Italians who’d worked on “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” with a mostly British cast and crew.

Philippe Pollet-Villard, director of “Le Mozart des Pickpockets (The Mozart of Pickpockets),” which won for live action short, kicked off his acceptance speech with “I don’t really speak English.”

The best animated short, “Peter & the Wolf,” was British and Polish. As the night wore on, the awards became slightly more American — culminating in the documentary awards presentation by the all-American Tom Hanks with U.S. service personnel abroad.

Even though it was produced by the very American Disney and Pixar, the animated feature trophy went to “Ratatouille” — you know, the movie about the French rat.

No Supervision Here! Caution – Scary Adults at Play!

 

“Which one do you think makes me look oobra-slutty? The French maid costume, Playboy bunny or Catwoman?”

 

Besides the obvious that you’ll probably never hear this question in real life – it does bring up an interesting point. When did Halloween become so sophisticated or involved for adults?

 

Most of us grew up wearing innocent looking costumes as kids, and now thanks to geeky loner psychologists saying young adults aren’t mentally mature until they’re 25, we don’t have to grow up EVER!

 

Yes, no more giant white pillow cases for adults. Oh no, we want glamour and most importantly attention for wearing the least amount of clothing possible.

 

When was the last time you saw a normal (read: boring) looking pirate costume for women? Or a genie or anything for that matter? Who needs taste when Halloween-related companies can cash in and cater to your inner sex kitten?

 

Men, however, seem to be the opposite when fulfilling their selfish fantasies. They clamor for oversized beer kegs and Fart-O-Meters.

 

So what does that say? Men are simple while women want to feel sexy? Isn’t this already an ongoing argument between married couples?

 

Answer this – how many women do you see wear enormous “God’s Gift” costumes?

 

This yearly decision on what to wear is becoming almost as important as whether to watch Must See TV or what to name a child. Ok, maybe not that far, but you get my point.

 

Costume shops everywhere seem to be turning up the heat. The New York Times is even taking notice saying women’s costumes “are more strip than storybook.” Yes, now once a year women can intentionally look like hookers and not even have work in a Nevada brothel!

 

I think we put too much emphasize on Halloween and to be truthful, it’s holiday discrimination. What about Talk Like a Pirate Day or Dictionary Day? None of us rush out and buy thousands of dictionaries on that day. Course it would make us a more literate nation and more competitive with the world’s super education countries.

 

But who wants that?

 

We could be on the verge of an underground sexual revolution here complete with home wreckers, sexy scholars and racy Little Red Riding Hoods!

 

Halloween is now about our inner ravenous witch or pirate; we can’t be suppressed forever as a sexually charged nation. It’s our First Amendment right!

 

One thing still holds true. It’s almost over and then we can focus on real issues like Hot Toddys vs. Eggnog.